Tuesday, March 27, 2012

"Little Talks" - Of Monsters And Men

Imma show you how proud I am
Remember back in the old days when people used to marry within their heritage to keep the bloodlines pure?  I guess you probably don't remember, because you'd be 700 years old now, and dead instead of reading this blog. Anyways, I like those days. I am annoyingly proud of my heritage (hey son, check out all of my foreign tattoos).  I am half Icelandic and half Ukranian.  Don't tell my Baba (Ukranian Grandma), but I might just be a little more proud to be Icelandic.  Come on, really though - even pierogi can't compete with Vikings!

There is nothing more gangster than Vikings, no saga more enchanting than Norse mythology, and nowhere as hauntingly beautiful as Iceland.  That being said, I feel like Iceland is misunderstood and misrepresented (like moi). The only significant media coverage Icelanders ever seem to get is for volcanoes erupting or the Country going bankrupt.  Besides epic glaciers and Huldufolk (Iceland's hidden people), Iceland is becoming known for their music festivals and homegrown talent.  Enter Of Monsters and Men, who gained their first success after winning The Icelandic Music Experiments: Musiktilraunir, a nationwide battle of the bands competition.
Iceland = Epic

My passion and interest in obscure and fantastic music is becoming increasingly more apparent to my friends, and I am so thrilled for your random texts suggesting songs I might be interested in.  The songs are my little treasures, just like you my elskans (my dears).

First thing I Googled - "What the hell does Of Monsters and Men stand for?" Through much creeping I found an article where the band explains, "We like looking up strange stories, stories about monsters and stuff. We're just kind of inspired by the whole weirdness of everything." Fair enough,  I'll take it.

Second thing I Googled - "What the hell is "Little Talks" about?" Now this search produced just over 1 million answers. It was amazing how people could interpret the same song in so many different ways.  From an abusive relationship, to someone going insane. A few people threw the possibility out there that the song might be referring to someone suffering from dementia.

Of Monsters and Men
My Amma (Icelandic Grandma)  suffered from dementia, and the more I read the lyrics the more that theme clicked with me.  I finally found an interview with the band who wrote that the story behind "Little Talks" is "about lovers that have gone away, It's basically about losing someone."  If you've ever known someone diagnosed with dementia the lyrics will speak to you a little bit, "There's an old voice in my head that's holding me back/I tell her that I miss our little talks", "I wish you'd disappear/All that's left is a ghost of you."  And this made me like the song even more, because it reminds me of my Amma now.  Not in a sad way, but in a nice way, like a hand on the shoulder.

What did you think of the song my little blog-bots?  How did you interpet it.

Skal!

Sources:  http://mplayer.pastemagazine.com/issues/week-10/articles#article=/issues/week-10/articles/of-monsters-and-men-icelands-folk-pop-stars





Hey! Hey! Hey!
I don't like walking around this old and empty house
So hold my hand, I"ll walk with you my dear
The stairs creak as I sleep, it's keeping me awake
It's the house telling you to close your eyes

Some days I can't even trust myself
It's killing me to see you this way

'Cause  though the truth may vary
This ship will carry
Our bodies safe to shore

Hey! Hey! Hey!
There's an old voice in my head that's holding me back
I tell her that I miss our little talks
Soon it will all be over, buired with our past
You used to play outside when you were young,
Full of life and full of love.

Some days I feel like I am wrong an I am right
Your mind is playing tricks on you my dear

'Cause  though the truth may vary
This ship will carry
Our bodies safe to shore

Hey!
Don't listen to a word I say
Hey!
They screams all sound the same
Hey!

'Cause  though the truth may vary
This ship will carry
Our bodies safe to shore

You're gone gone gone away
I watched you disappear
All that's left is a ghost of you
Now we're torn torn torn apart
There's nothing we can do
Just let me go, we'll meet again soon

Now wait wait wait for me
Please hang around
I see you when I fall asleep

Hey!
Don't listen to a word I say
Hey!
They screams all sound the same
Hey!

'Cause  though the truth may vary
This ship will carry
Our bodies safe to shore\

Hey!
Don't listen to a word I say
Hey!
They screams all sound the same
Hey!

'Cause  though the truth may vary
This ship will carry
Our bodies safe to shore x 3

6 comments:

  1. Wow, I just found this song, and before i started looking up what it meant, the first thing i thought of was my grandmother, who also had dementia. The lyrics remind me so much of the the love between her and my grandfather, how he cared for her so deeply until the day she died, even though she was completely gone the last few years of her life. For me, love is 'ship that carried their bodies to shore." And the music video speaks to me like a kind of purgatory of the mind, where she is young and beautiful again, searching for her love. The joy on the girls face at the end of the video feels like a glorious reunion to me. The song and music video bring me so much joy, thinking of my grandparents are together again somewhere.

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  2. @DCKelly09 I'm glad you liked the post! This song is very comforting for me as well. I love how music can help you preserve the memories of those no longer with us. I'm sure they are all watching over us now and smiling :)

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  3. This song came out while I was living with my Gram during home hospice. She also had dementia. It's always been "her song." We had these conversations exactly in both lucid and not so lucid moments. About just holding onto the moments. About how she was ok and I was with her. About how much I was going to miss her when she was gone and her telling me she was never going too far. Still makes me tear up and she's been gone three years yesterday (which is why I'm thinking and looking around the Internet today...) Thanks for this post. Glad it struck other people the same way.

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  4. This song came out while I was living with my Gram during home hospice. She also had dementia. It's always been "her song." We had these conversations exactly in both lucid and not so lucid moments. About just holding onto the moments. About how she was ok and I was with her. About how much I was going to miss her when she was gone and her telling me she was never going too far. Still makes me tear up and she's been gone three years yesterday (which is why I'm thinking and looking around the Internet today...) Thanks for this post. Glad it struck other people the same way.

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    1. I love this song still, it reminds me of my Amma (Grandma) too every time I hear it. A nice reminder :)

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  5. This song reminds me of my dad. He has had a neurological disease which has taken a toll on his mind. Now, I have the same conversations over and over with him, almost word for word and he's lucky if he can add two small numbers together in his head. He can't take care of himself and he will be going into a nursing home very soon. It's hard to describe how it feels to miss someone who's still technically here and the regrets you have in your relationship with them. This song comes close to describing that. I was too young to actually remember this myself, but my neighbors have told me stories about how when he was first diagnosed how he was. How he'd step out of his car and fall. Take two steps down the walkway and fall. Climb one step on the stairs and fall. And whenever anyone asked him if he needed help, he'd tell them over and over, "I'm gonna beat this. I'm gonna beat this". Sad to say it looks like he won't.

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